Name: Nate Brown

Current Institution: Northwestern

Major: Economics and English Literature

GLP Class: 2015

Meet Nate: Nate Brown is an alumni of the 2015 Global Leaders Program graduating class. Nate is double majoring at Northwestern University in Economics and English Literature. He completed his first year at the University of Wisconsin. Nate recently added his English Literature major and is excited to see where this passion will take him. In the Summer of 2016, Nate served as a Program Instructor for the Illinois Tech Global Leaders Program and has remained a loyal alumni to our program. Read the Q&A below to learn about Nate’s experience in college so far, and how GLP has prepared him for where he is today.

Q&A with Nate Brown:


What is the best part about your university?

“I think the best part so far is probably the professors and their willingness to want to see people succeed. I think that it is harder here than it was for me in Wisconsin because of the fast pace and competition, but you can meet with your professors in office hours and they are enthusiastic about the material.”

What is your favorite part about your major?

“I think that the reason why I choose to do economics is because it’s very open. Rather than memorization, it feels like I am trained on how to analyze general situations and how to use my critical thinking skills. I also think there is a lot I can do with a major in economics. It leads most people into business but you can also go into law or education as well. Economics keeps the door open, and I always want to keep my options open because I’m always changing my mind.”

How has GLP helped you prepare for college?

“The best thing GLP did for me in terms of college prep was the group work we did together. A lot of regular high school work is very much on your own, and occasionally a group project. In college there is a lot of collaboration, whether it’s with your professor or TA or classmates. GLP involves working with a lot of people and coming up with solutions you couldn’t figure out or articulate on your own. Gaining communication skills was the most beneficial for me.”

What challenges have you encountered since graduating high school? How have you addressed them?

“The biggest challenge was applying to 9 colleges and only getting into University of Wisconsin, while trying to find the school that was the right fit for me. I think I really felt like I belonged in Northwestern out of high school and when I went to to University of Wisconsin, it wasn’t for me. Trying to go somewhere new again was scary but a good move. The Northwestern campus, in general, is smaller with a bigger focus on academics.”

Anything that is surprising about college?

“I think that one thing that surprised me is how easy it is to meet people. I always thought it would be scary and hard to meet people and make friends but I think everyone here has the same goals to learn and better ourselves. And everyone in their first year is trying to make friends and are cognizant that you want to meet each other. It isn’t weird to ask someone to hang out; it’s easy to go to class and talk to somebody.”

What programs are you participating in if any?

“One of my favorite things I still do is volunteer at GLP! I really like being able to give back, because a lot of people stay on campus and do homework, but being able to leave campus and do something meaningful is cool. On campus, I work with student theatre where there’s always some way to get involved. I’m also on the Evanston Boxing team because it’s good exercise and it is stress relieving. I am also on the exec board for the Insight group on campus and we pair undergrads with professional mentors – who are mostly in grad school with the Kellogg School of Management. I like to give back and help fellow undergraduates because it is nice to always have someone to look up to and seek advice from. I am applying to be a peer adviser next fall, which involves helping with Northwestern orientation. I think having an older transfer student there to tell people they are going to be okay was helpful for me so I want to give that back. That’s really important to me.”

Where do you see yourself in the next ten years?

“Ten years for now I will be 29- that’s crazy- so I think by 29 I think I would like to go into management consulting because it is a great opportunity to travel and explore different fields. Then I would like to go back to school and maybe get an MBA and stick with the business world or become certified to be an English teacher in the state of Illinois. I think I have always been called as a leader to young people. I probably want to have a dog as well.”

What advice would you give seniors that are going to be freshmen in college?

“I think the most important piece of advice I could give is to just try new things and to not be afraid of rejection. There are always opportunities to drop out of something but never always the opportunity to try something new. With boxing I had never done that before and it was foreign to me, but I seemed like an opportunity to do something new and I enjoyed it. I tried out for theatre and didn’t make it, but I did design a set and that has been really fulfilling for me as a creative outlet. So I think do new things- you may even find your career choice.”

What are you most proud of so far/ What have you accomplished so far in your past year(s) of college?

“I think that I’m proud of adding my English Literature major. I really liked reading books and literature in general but it felt like people believed that individuals who are English teachers don’t get high paying jobs and that made me afraid. It was exciting for me to not care what other people had to say or how much money I might or might not make, because it felt right. I think being able to come to terms with a passion and admit them regardless of what other people think was kind of cool.”

Other Comments: “I think that through GLP I was able to really try out a lot of things and meet a lot of different people and I think that’s been really valuable. I think that it’s a unique opportunity and anyone who thinks even for a second that they want to apply: should apply”.

Alumni Spotlight Interview: Nate Brown