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Archive for the ‘Design’ Category

Department of Energy Creates Online-Learning Platform for Technical Training – Wired Campus – The Chronicle of Higher Education

June 22nd, 2012 No comments

Department of Energy Creates Online-Learning Platform for Technical Training – Wired Campus – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Interesting piece today from Wired Campus in the Chronicle about a new open-source online learning platform used to build 3d models…

Categories: Design, General, Ideas, News Tags:

Hundreds of Open Source, Indexed, Peer-Reviewed Pedagogical Best Practices! – Magna Publications

June 15th, 2012 No comments

Hundreds of Open Source, Indexed, Peer-Reviewed Pedagogical Best Practices! – Magna Publications.

The latest edition of the Magna Publications newsletter Distance Education Report discusses the Teaching Online Pedagogical Repository (TOPR) at the University of Central Florida. It’s a public resource for faculty looking for online teaching strategies - content in TOPR  is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Check it out at http://topr.online.ucf.edu/index.php/Main_Page!

SLATE ’11 – photos, videos, notes, handouts, and reflections shared by participants at 2011 SLATE Conference, October 13-14, 2011

October 17th, 2011 No comments

SLATE ’11 – photos, videos, notes, handouts, and reflections shared by participants at 2011 SLATE Conference, October 13-14, 2011.

Last week a few IIT faculty and staff attended the SLATE (Supporting Learning And Technology in Education – Midwest Blackboard User’s Group) Conference held in downtown Chicago, at the University of Chicago’s Gleacher Center. The conference provided forums for all participants – faculty and staff from several neighboring institutions -to connect and learn from each other, by discussing best practices and implementation strategies for not only the Blackboard LMS, but for online learning in general.  As an institution moving toward the next generation of Blackboard within the next year, IIT Faculty and staff took the opportuntiy to learn more about what to expect and what to plan for, and how to make the transition a successful transition for everyone involved. Check out this year’s notes, conference run-down, and comments from the link above.

SLATE not only discusses issues and concerns related to Blackboard, but also fosters discussion of broader issues in areas like online learning and pedagogy, program integrity, and faculty development. Meetings are hosted regularly throughout the year by member institutions. For more information about SLATE, visit SLATE at http://slategroup.uchicago.edu/.

Supporting Bboogle: BbWorld 2011

August 17th, 2011 No comments

Bboogle? With so many things going on at the start of semester, the last thing faculty need is a new word… So, what is Bboogle? Blackboard (Bb) + Google.

Supporting Bboogle: BbWorld 2011.

Our colleagues on the north side, at Northwestern University, have been developing a free building block for Blackboard integration with Google apps. Here at IIT, we may want to take a closer look - especially in light of our transition this semester to Gmail for students and Google Apps for Education for everyone.

This past year IIT Online has taken an active role in becoming part of the larger Chicagoland education community around Blackboard and technologies in education, by participating in SLATE, http://slategroup.uchicago.edu/. Today’s meeting was hosted by Northwestern and gave IIT Online a chance to network with and learn from other institutions. One result was a discussion of Bboogle and its possibilities.

Take a look and let us know what you think!

Also too – Faculty, please be on the lookout for our IIT Online survey of faculty needs and best practices. As we’re looking to deliver innovative and excellent education to our students, we need to better understand the needs of our faculty. If you don’t have the link, please let me or Brad Katz know.

Wishing all of our faculty (and students) the best for the new semester!

Lauren

Interesting Buzz and Whatnot RE: Online Learning

April 13th, 2011 No comments

Below are a few links I’ve run across recently discussing online education, open  access, and quality. Whether k-12, community college, or university, more and more and more students learn online. With each press on a keyboard and swipe across a screen, students learn. And they are learning much more than the content displaying in front of them. They learn to expect certain features and even principles as the norm.  As these expectations, fueled by both academic and non-academic forays into the world of instant access and information, become more sophisticated – not to mention, more demanding – we, as academic content providers, must become learners ourselves, expect more, and become more demanding. So that what we provide and how we provide it continues to engage students and allows them to think beyond the immediate and truly achieve their potential.

http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Quarterly/EDUCAUSEQuarterlyMagazineVolum/MobileTeachingVersusMobileLear/225846

http://mashable.com/2011/01/03/virtual-classroom/

http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/distance-learning/when-librarians-faculty-and-instructional-designers-team-up-students-win/

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/06/education/06online.html?_r=1

Categories: Design, General, Ideas, Research Tags:

Calling All IIT Online Students – What made you choose IIT Online?

March 16th, 2011 No comments

If you are a current student or an alum of one of IIT’s distance learning programs offered through IIT Online, IIT Online wants to hear from you!

Why did you choose distance learning in general and IIT Online in particular? How does the distance learning program or coruses help you in ways that the were just not available in our traditional face-to-face classes?

We will gather replies, post a summary, and use your comments as we continue to improve our programs.

Thanks,

Lauren

7 Things You Should Know…

January 6th, 2011 No comments

7 Things You Should Know is a monthly series on emerging learning technologies published by EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI).

The latest brief discusses Android, the Linux-based open-source operating system for mobile devices and competitor to Apple’s iOS. Learn how Android is bringing mobile technology even more into the learning experience.

Check out 7 Things page in the ELI Resources section by EDUCAUSE to see all of the monthly topics in this long-running series from its most recent on Android (Dec 2010) to one of its first, Clickers (May 2005).

Loyola University Chicago | “Teaching with Technology Guide.”

November 8th, 2010 No comments

Loyola University Chicago has done a really nice job putting together their “Teaching with Technology Guide.”

As with any resource designed to serve a specific institution, external folks should be aware that certain policies may not be applicable and particular tools may not be supported.

In general, though, an impressive and fairly comprehensive resource.

Data Visualization Documentary

September 30th, 2010 No comments

Really nice piece about data visualization, the potential as well as some of misapplications and missteps: Journalism in the Age of Data from geoff mcghee on Vimeo.

The focus here is on journalism (and communicating to a lay audience), but has clear application beyond that for the academic/educational context. Also some solid basic lessons about communicating information that are of value for creating simple slide decks like PowerPoint.

A few of the resources mentioned later in the video are:

Tools

Google charts

Protovis

Flare

Swivel

Blogs

Information Aesthetics

Flowing Data

Swivel (company blog)

Curb Cuts and iPads: Universal Design meets Technology in the Classroom

September 17th, 2010 No comments

Reading two seemingly unrelated blog posts and comments in the Chronicle’s online ProfHacker series got me thinking about distance learning – one was about the lack of universal design, accessibility accommodations in universities, particularly web sites (http://chronicle.com/blogPost/Academic-Resources-and/26497/). The other was about a professor who declared his summer English Lit classroom a technology free zone (http://chronicle.com/article/College-20-Teachers-Witho/123891/).   

The first blog discussed the notion that websites, especially those at universities, should build accessibility into their web design process by embracing the concept of universal design, design to make life a little easier for everyone. Like curb cuts, the author said, quoting Dwell magazine’s article “Introduction to Universal Design,” those dips in the curbs at intersections designed to accommodate wheel chairs. Those dips also make curbs easier for everyone to navigate, from parents with strollers to commuters with rolling briefcases.

The second post, as one might imagine, launched much debate about the general merits of technology in the classroom. One comment noted that it all depends on the user, much like a terrific chef using “a pile of sticks and a match” creates a far better meal than a lousy chef who has the “fanciest commercial stove on the market.”

So what do curb cuts, chefs, universal design, and technology in the classroom have to do with distance learning? Everything.  If universal design can make something more accessible for everyone, why not apply that same thinking to utilizing technology in the classroom or to designing courses in general? I’ve since come to find out, that this is not the novel idea I first thought it was – turns out the concept of universal design for learning (UDL) has been around for a while.  Its principles were developed around 1997 and the term, “universal design for learning, coined by CAST, the Center for Applied Special Technology (http://www.cast.org/).  

The idea is to make courses more “useful,” or more “accessible,” for all students. Much of the current research related to higher education and UDL focuses on accommodating disabled learners (http://www.ahead.org/resources/universal-design). However, since the term universal design applies to everyone, let’s take it step further to include whether or not students participate at a distance. Many of our courses at IIT are blended: students attending remotely learn right alongside (virtually, at least) students attending the live session.  What might be considered an accommodation of distance learner, might also assist the student attending the live session, or vice versa. The trick is in intentionally selecting tools to engage all students.

The first step, as with almost everything, is to define the issue –identify what needs to be accessible. With courses, I would argue, the answer is the course objectives. What do students need to master in the course? Faculty answer that question all the time. Once the objectives are established, look for the best tools and resources that will help all students.  Here’s where we can think outside the box, as it were. Again, intentionality is key. The best tool may or may not be a traditional course lecture. And it may or may not be the next cool thing in technology, like the iPad, or its newest rival. Technology must always support course and program outcomes, not “coolness” factors. More likely than not, there is no one right tool, but a combination of tools to engage multiple learning styles and environments. IIT has a wealth of resources for faculty in its Blackboard system – every course at IIT has a Blackboard (Bb) shell, whether or not it is designated an internet course.  Perhaps one Bb feature, discussion boards, graded or not, could be used to reinforce lecture points for both distance and non-distance learners, for all students.  Interestingly, this is keeping with what that Dwell article identifies as a principle of universal design, making “information … available through several senses at once.” After all, aren’t learning styles based on senses?

Debating the use of technology in the classroom has gone on and will go on for ages. In the meantime, answer this question, how can technology support all students’ mastery of course objectives?  So how do you use technology to make your courses “accessible” for all of your students, both those sitting in class and at a distance? 

Read more about it:

http://chronicle.com/blogPost/Academic-Resources-and/26497/

http://chronicle.com/article/College-20-Teachers-Witho/123891/

http://www.dwell.com/articles/an-introduction–to-universal-design.html

http://www.udlcenter.org/

http://www.udlcenter.org/sites/udlcenter.org/files/UDL2ndDecade_0.pdf

http://www.cast.org/

http://www.ahead.org/